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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  August 19, 2010 3:05am-4:30am EDT

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>> reporter: four of the technicians responsible still work for the lab and the state is promising they'll be disciplined. greg taylor said that's a start. >> what is it worth to miss your daughter's 10th birthday.
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you couldn't give me anything for missing that. >> reporter: steve osunsami, abc news, atlanta approximate. the south carolina mother accused of killing her two toddlers is remorseful. that's according to her attorney. shaquan duley was formally charged in those murders yesterday. she's expected to undergo a psychiatric examination. her attorney says duley has also been meeting with the family minister. there are still plenty of questions for the jury that convicted former illinois governor rod blagojevich. the jurors found blagojevich guilty of just one of the 24 counts. chris bury spoke to some of them. >> reporter: now a convicted felon, blagojevich is still claiming victory. >> on every count except for one, and every charge except for one, they could not prove that i did anything wrong. >> reporter: what he did not say, on the most explosive charge, trying to sell that senate seat, every juror but one quoted to convict him. led by the jury foreman. >> i think the prosecution
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proved its case. i had him guilty on all 24 counts. >> reporter: hunted in vain for the lone holdout, a middle-aged woman. other jurors told us she dug in early and could not be budged. >> there was just differences that we couldn't overcome. >> if it was a murder trial she wanted to see the video of the person shooting the other person. >> smoking gun. >> she wanted that. >> reporter: on those fbi wiretaps -- >> how about health and human services, can i get that? >> reporter: what she heard was blagojevich blowing smoke, not committing crimes. >> looking at the evidence, what she saw was a politician just talking. >> joust politics as usual? >> just politics. >> reporter: that a single juror derailed the government's case may give some comfort to prosecutors who plan to retry blagojevich. but his lawyers are already blasting a new trial as a waste of taxpayers' money. the government is paying them because blagojevich is broke. >> why should the people of illinois pay a criminal defense lawyer when we've already been
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through trial? >> reporter: for the feds it may be money well spent. given the odds -- they win more than nine times in ten. chris bury, abc news, chicago. a veteran american airlines employee has some explaining to do. now that he's been accused of stealing passengers' valuables. henry ivara cleans jets for american. police found out he was keeping items passengers left behind. when they traced a missing smart phone to his house, it was one of more than 170 items worth thousands of dollars that police say he kept. now here is a look at your wednesday weather. another soaker in the south. heavy downpours across louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. showers from florida to virginia. thunderstorms, hail and gusty winds from the dakotas into wisconsin. thunderstorms in the southwest. >> 94 in colorado springs. 89 in boise. 80 in fargo. 90 in omaha. 103 in dallas. 80s from boston to atlanta. 90s from new orleans to miami. it is certainly not for the faint of heart. but those who love it say it is
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a breeze. >> the best wind riders from across the country are taking to the skies in western texas this week. it's this year's hang gliding competition in big spring. it's sort of the hang gliding mecca because of its winds and numerous clouds. >> as in any race the competitors must follow a course. one hang glider describes the sport as pure freedom. very cool. >> very nice. we'll be right back. assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that could improve your may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen ...
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your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. why should you call the scooter store today? because their mobility experts are also medicare experts. and that means the scooter store is your best shot at qualifying for a scooter that costs you little to nothing. hi i'm doug harrison. pay little to nothing out of pocket. how do we do it? we know what it takes to get you your power chair it's our strength. it's our mission. and we back it up with the scooter store guarantee. if we qualify you and medicare denies your claim for a new powerchair or scooter, i'll give it to you absolutely free. i paid into medicare all my life, and when i needed it the benefit was there for me. the scooter store made it so easy. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair.
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the scooter store got me back out in the world again. talk to. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. why go one more round ? you don't need a rematch, but a rethink. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities
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while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a co-pay as low as zero dollars at lunesta.com discover a restful lunesta night.
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we think of the heart of hearing, we often think of the elderly. now a new study shows teens are at risk for hearing loss as well. >> researchers say one in five teenagers have experienced some form of hearing impairment. t.j. winick reports. >> reporter: a chainsaw. 100 decibels. a rock concert. 115 decibels. this is how loud many teens are listening to their mp3 and cd players. doctors believe that's having
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some pretty devastating effects. >> about one out of five adolescents in the united states has at least some evidence of hearing loss. >> reporter: those are the results from a new study published this week in the prestigious "journal of the american medical association." one in five teens suffering some hearing loss is a significant jump. up 30% when compared with previous generations. >> i just want you to raise your hand every time you her a beep. >> reporter: hearing experts theorize listening to devices like ipods and cell phones at high volumes for a long time is the chief culprit. most of the young people we spoke to here on the streets of new york city say they're not completely surprised by the study's findings. >> it becomes so loud. but the sound quality is so great that it's feeding off demand which my generation has for this music. you know? we just want to hear it the best we can. >> reporter: still, doctors know there are other possible reasons for early hearing loss. >> how loud even the lunch room
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is. when i'm going home listening to my music, if we're going to concerts or even sports events. >> reporter: 17-year-old alexa curran is having her hearing tested. >> once you lose it it's not coming back so just be careful how much noise exposure you have. >> reporter: it's a message alexa and hearing experts hope grows louder by the day. t.j. winick, abc news, new york. >> you know, eventually all the cell phones and ipods, you knew something like this was coming in terms of hearing loss. everyone has them these days. you hear them sometimes walking down the street, hear someone else's in their ear, how are they not going deaf right now? >> i'm guilty of it. i pull my ipod after i run, i have a slight headache. i never really equate that. i was like, whatever. i think the reality is a lot of us are doing it and we don't know. coming up, rob's find something common ground after moving here to new york. >> i've had quite a few people who have made the move just like me from the big easy to the big apple. our special bond coming up next.
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all week long rob has taken us along as he learns the ropes of new york. >> i've learned you can take about anyone out of new orleans but you can't take the new orleans out of anybody. even if they move from the big easy to the big apple. ♪ >> reporter: it's a long-held belief in new orleans that natives of the city rarely ever leave. that it's simply too hard to cut the strings to such a unique hometown. >> i think anybody from new orleans that's born and raised there has such an affinity for it. and it's so in your blood that no place else could ever be like new orleans. >> reporter: but even in new york, this sprawling city of 8 million people, i had little trouble finding those just like me who have traded in the bayou
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for broadway. >> have i become a new yorker? yeah, i have. but don't tell anybody. because you know, from the south, you know -- don't bust me. >> reporter: the folks we found shared their insight and advice about their yankee life. and it didn't take long to find some common impressions about living here in new york. >> the variety of personalities that you come across. i mean, new york obviously is the international city. >> new orleans has a great sense of where'd you go to high school? who are your people? new york, on the other hand, is a city of people from all over the country, they're literally from all over the world. >> reporter: in such a diverse city, what about all that southern hospitality? >> it's a very big adjustment, that you know, people don't exhibit the same level of care for other people here. >> new over lienians talk to strangers. they talk to people they don't know.
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new york may not quite be that way. walking down first avenue, i said good morning, whatever. and just -- i got this stare. this stereotypical stare. what's wrong with you? >> reporter: maybe that kind of charm is hard to find in a city this big, moving this fast. >> i just love the fast pace. there's always something to do in new york city. >> reporter: and keeping that pace ain't cheap. >> it's crazy how much it costs to live here. when you tell people how much you pay for rent, they look at you like, are you -- are you serious? >> reporter: naturally, most everyone we spoke with missed all that good southern food. >> don't order anything called a po boy in a new york restaurant. >> they may say it's cajun cooking. they may really think that it's the flavor of new orleans. it's not. >> reporter: still, there's always an upside. >> best thing about living in new york, you can eat at any time, anything you want. >> reporter: robin roberts is a
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native of southern mississippi, which as stone's throw from new orleans. robin has lived on the east coast now for 20 years. and she warmly welcomed the new guy. >> when it's all said and done, you're going to be an old man one day. and you're going to say, i live in new york city! yes, i did, i did, i worked and lived in the big apple, i did! >> reporter: despite all her success in the big apple, it's easy to see she's still a southern girl at heart. >> because there's no place like home. i don't care who we are, where we're from. we're always going to -- but i tell you what, new york is a nice home away from home. >> reporter: and i guess that's a common sentiment for all the folks we spoke to. they came here to new york to chase their dreams or to take a good job. jay sirio fell in love and came here to be with his new yorker wife. >> it's always where the woman wants to move to. >> reporter: everyone has a reason for coming here to new york. but home will always be home.
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>> it's a strong connection to the city. even after you leave. >> our kids will probably speak a little bit of a new york accent. make no mistake about it, they're die-hard saints fans. all right? and they love new orleans. >> you never forget your roots? >> always be new orleans. >> reporter: but the trick as always is to sometimes just sit back and enjoy a new ride. >> get out and about. don't stay stuck in one spot. discover and explore, meet new people. >> it's an adventure up here, rob. it is, it's a beautiful, wonderful adventure. and that's the way you look at it. >> some very cool people in this piece. special thank you to robin roberts for sitting down and doing that interview with me. it's good to find some people who knew new orleans and appreciate what it is but also appreciate new york as well. cool. >> i think that's my favorite of all the pieces. anyone who comes to new york thinks those things.
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>> exactly. a good second home like she said. [ female announcer ] fact.
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"world news now" delivers your "morning papers." >> welcome back, everybody. this is footage we've seen before but it never looks any less scary every time you see it. this is footage from an air show in santa fe, argentina. 22-year-old pilot in the middle of a maneuver upside down, literally the wing falls off the plane when he's upside down the middle of a maneuver. even more amazing, almost 1,700 feet, he was able to deploy that parachute, fall safely to the earth. the plane of course crashed in a swath of flames. but he made it out okay. only injury, a burned foot. he made it out okay. in this argentina air show. amazing footage. he escaped with very, very minor injuries after something horrific in mid-air. >> do they know what happened?
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>> he called it mental fatigue. maybe it's something he did inadvertently. sorry, metal fatigue. >> i would hate to think that you could -- yeah. that makes me scared. okay, i have to tell you this next paper, i sort of have a gleam in my eye when i recite this. because i feel like us women, we have been struggling our whole lives with things like girdles. now there is the myrtle, the man girdle. take a look because these things are becomiing big. sales up 10% over the course of the past year. these are exactly what you'd think they are, super-tight fitted shirts for guys so that all your stuff is always bulging out. we don't have to look at for a change. interesting thing to me is you guys have different things. women, we traditionally have upper body, lower body, what have you. for guys there's thigh firming bottoms, the tight muscle shirt. this one's really weird to me. there's socks. >> that make your feet smaller? >> i don't know, men have fat feet. apparently you guys do.
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they're saying these are absolutelyish and they're sleek. a lot of times for females you need someone else to like tie you up in that or help you with the pliers pull something up. >> how do you wear -- >> none of that, you can get into it on your own. >> they look so uncomfortable. how do y'all do that? it looks like they're so constricting. you can have trouble breathing. >> why do you think i'm happy you guys have to do it? >> any particular thing you'd recommend for me? >> no, never, not on-air. >> thought i'd get you to bite on this one. more fun video here. this is a 45-year-old father, glen dabi, out in hungary. he has a new way of trying to convert young folks into the church. he skateboards for them, entertains the young kids, and that is his way of -- not convert. that's trying to lure them back into the church. in a youthful, entertaining way. >> will he fall on his face in the next
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shipping out. a major move as american combat troops leave iraq. however, the military's work is far from done. then, the salmonella scare involving hundreds of millions of eggs. serious illness, safety precautions, and the historic recall. and, brain drain. the man paralyzed by love sickness. >> he's having a tough time. >> it's thursday, august 19th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> i think we've all heard about being paralyzed by fear. this guy is so paralyzed by love, he can't even keep family photos up in the house. >> isn't that incredible? they say love is almost a prison for him, where it's a source of joy for most of us. incredible story. >> definitely stick around for that one. good morning and thanks for
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being with us. i'm vinita nair. >> i'm rob nelson. the war in iraq has now passed a major milestone. the last u.s. combat brigade has now left that country. >> after more than seven years, members of the 4th stryker brigade 2nd infantry are heading home. t.j. winick reports on the future of u.s. involvement in iraq. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. to be clear, the combat operation is not over until the end of august when the remaining brigades will be remissioned to advise and assist brigades. these are pictures america has been desperately waiting for. troops rolling across the border crossing out of iraq and into kuwait. this is the last combat brigade to leave iraq. the 4,000 men and women of the 4th stryker brigade 2nd infantry division. after almost seven and a half years of war, there is much to be thankful for. >> immense, immense relief. it's over. it's all over for us. >> reporter: the stryker brigade, named for the vehicle that delivers soldiers into and
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out of battle, has lost 34 of its troops. it was at the forefront of some of the fiercest fighting, including eastern baghdad, a hotbed of the insurgency during the surge of 2007. >> kind of mixed feelings about it. because we're going home, you know. in spite of what everybody says, we are kind of making history here. >> reporter: president obama had set august 31st as the deadline for ending american combat operations in iraq. so while the last combat brigade has left, the official combat mission will not end for another couple of weeks. >> our commitment in iraq is changing. from a military effort led by our troops, to a civilian effort led by our diplomats. >> reporter: 50,000 u.s. troops will remain in-country in noncombat roles until the end of next year. rob and rin nita? dozens of criminal cases in north carolina must be reinvestigated after a scathing report about tainted evidence. it says agents at the state's crime lab doctored reports about
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blood evidence to help prosecutors win cases. the report also says that critical information was intentionally kept from defense attorneys. 190 cases were studied, stretching over a 16-year period. >> we were encouraged to turn over every rock and look at everything. the full case files in each of these cases should be reviewed by both prosecutors and appropriate defense counsel. >> three people convicted in those cases have already been executed. four others are on death row, and five have died behind bars. one of the cases involves two men who were convicted of murdering michael jordan's father. there has been a dramatic increase in the number of eggs being recalled because of a salmonella scare. the wright county egg company expanded the recall to 380 million eggs. that is nearly 32 million cartons. as don guevara reports, the eggs were distributed nationwide. >> reporter: the contaminated eggs have all been traced back to a company in iowa.
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so far, more than 200 people have gotten sick in colorado, minnesota, and california where the most outbreaks have occurred. it has spread to others. because the symptoms are so common -- fever, cramps, and diarrhea -- people could be infected and not even know. >> this outbreak could really be one of the largest linked to eggs that we've seen in 20 years. >> reporter: 13 companies package the eggs, including major supermarkets like albertson's and ralphs, who have since issued warnings. ralphs sent this phone message to customers. >> this call is from your local ralphs store with an important recall announcement. >> reporter: inside this albertson's they've posted a sign warning of the recall and assuring their customers they've removed the tainted eggs from the shelves. still, there is concern. >> we eat a lot of eggs. want to make sure that we don't get sick from it. >> reporter: experts say this strain of salmonella comes from a hen's infected ovaries which
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passes the bacteria inside the egg. >> the birds themselves aren't sick so the farmer doesn't even know what's going on. in the meantime, it's producing eggs that look clean and fine. >> reporter: the fda is investigating the cause of the outbreak. don guevara, abc news, los angeles. we have dramatic new video to show you this morning showing monday's miracle plane landing on a caribbean island. the amateur video was shot moments after the plane slammed into the ground with 131 on board. it was first thought that the only fatality was due to a heart attack. but an autopsy shows the 72-year-old woman died from injuries she suffered during the crash. now to spain and the panic during a bullfight. the bull got a running start and jumped right into the stands. look at that video. it sent spectators in all directions, you can imagine. 30 people were injured in all that chaos. five of them had to go to the hospital. that bull was eventually subdued and removed from the stands by a crane.
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the animal was later killed. >> was someone grabbing it by the tail? is that what we just saw? wow. >> i hope not, wow. >> brave soul. bedbug infestations have reached crisis proportions and it so is bad the federal government is now getting involved. linsey davis reports on what is being done to win the bedbug battle. >> reporter: overnight, bedbugs have become so much of a concern, several states are calling on the big guns for help. at least five states are pleading for money to get rid of these pesky blood suckers. representatives and experts from a long list of government agencies, including the department of defense, met in columbus, ohio, to talk bedbugs. >> hopefully we're going to see more resources devoted to various things such as educational things, resources perhaps to help people who can't pay for treatment. >> reporter: ohio was so desperate, they petitioned the government to allow in-home use of a pesticide banned out of concern for its effects on kids. that request was denied. >> this is a resurgence all
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across the board at this point. it's a very serious problem. >> reporter: in lexington, kentucky, bedbugs force people in ft. worth, texas, the city housing authority spent $500,000 to rid this apartment building of the pests. it didn't work. in seattle, bedbug calls to exterminators have spiked. contrary to their name, bedbugs aren't limited to beds. this times square movie theater is back open after shutting its doors tuesday night to deal with the paranoia and panic-inducing parasite. bedbugs tend to be nocturnal. they like to hide in cracks and crevices, often in and around mattresses. they're visible to the eye. they bite humans and it's painful. the retro pests were eradicated from the u.s. around the end of world war ii. but in the last decade, they've been making a comeback. >> it has to do with the pesticides we use not being as effective as they once were in the '50s, '60s and '70s. immunity makes them more difficult to treat. >> reporter: a painful pest that
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has many people this summer on edge. linsey davis, abc news, new york. >> and that movie theater in times square is where i was last weekend. >> no, no no! here's your thursday forecast. more heavy rain in the south. the worst storms in louisiana, mississippi, and alabama. showers from florida up to virginia. stormy from the dakotas to wisconsin. thunderstorms and downpours in the four corners of the southwest. >> 92 in albuquerque. a cool 68 in seattle. that sounds nice. 78 in portland. mostly 80s from fargo to detroit. just shy of 90 here in new york and atlanta. one more story before i burn my jacket. a pet lover in australia is snapping up a lot of attention. >> vicki lowling has such a passion for crocodiles that she keeps three at home. she walks 14-year-old johnny through the neighborhood on a leash, and at home johnny has the run of the house. lowling also keeps a smaller croc in her tub. on top of that there's an eight-foot-long baby croc in a
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tank stored in her garage. >> she's crazy, clearly. last year her husband told her it is either the crocodiles or him. and gentlemen, great news, she's on the market. they got divorced. >> go get 'em, boys. >> be right back. okay, audition in two weeks. whiten your smile. no red wine, blueberry pie, coffee, or tea. i've got it. ♪ [ female announcer ] introducing crest 3d white toothpaste. the remarkable new toothpaste that removes up to 80% of surface stains in just two weeks. good advice. in just two weeks. new crest 3d white toothpaste.
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why go one more round ? you don't need a rematch, but a rethink. with lunesta. lunesta is thought to interact with gaba receptors associated with sleep. lunesta helps you get the restful sleep you need. lunesta has some risk of dependency. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving or engaging in other activities while asleep without remembering it the next day have been reported. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. stop fighting with your sleep. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. get lunesta for a co-pay as low as zero dollars at lunesta.com discover a restful lunesta night. to an excellent getaway.
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no more hats. hearings begin today on capitol hill looking into seafood safety, of course, after the gulf of mexico oil spill. >> scientists are trying to determine the pollution's long-term impact. bob woodruff reports on lessons learned from past oil disasters. >> reporter: before this year, the biggest spill ever was the 1979 oil spill in the gulf of
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mexico. >> this will be the site of the world's worst offshore oil disaster. >> reporter: 140 million gallons. and before bp, the most famous was the "exxon valdez" in 1989 off the coast of alaska. just one-twentieth of the size of the bp spill. two history lessons about what may happen next after the current disaster. let's start with the biggest spill. it actually landed here in padre island in texas. in fact, it was a strip about 170 miles long and 30 feet wide. it was so bad it actually looked like a paved highway. many people here thought it would never recover. but it did. so what happened? >> to my amazement we saw recovery in just a couple of years. the shrimp came back in about two years. >> reporter: but when dr. westunnel went back to mexico he found oil tar still soaked into the marshes. fishermen told him 31 years later, the oysters still have not returned. which brings us to that famous
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spill, the "exxon valdez" in 1989. 21,000 gallons of oil still infest the shore. alaska's herring have never fully recovered. but in the gulf, animals and plants might fare better. >> the gulf of mexico is a hugely resilient body of water. there's the equivalent of one to two super tankers per year that seep into the gulf of mexico waters naturally. it populates the entire gulf of mexico with petroleum-eating bacteria. there's lots of them out there that are munching away on this oil all the time. >> reporter: so a third history lesson in the making. but probably not the last. bob woodruff, abc news, padre island, texas. >> now sort of the newest word from all of this is that the government's point man, the guy we've been hearing from so often, thad allen, he is now saying, no time line, we can't give a fixed time line because the reality is that things keep getting pushed back and it affects our credibility.
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>> people on the gulf hear those horror stories about other spills and 20, 30 years later they still find oil on the rocks and animals, it's scary. this thing's not over. that's probably the safest best at this point.t at this point. coming up next, the man who is literally profoundly lovesick. >> the unusual diagnosis and lovesick. >> the unusual diagnosis and what is let's turn over this log. yeah! both: whoa! i like the big black ones. i like the brown wiggly ones. mmm. i like the green crunchy ones myself. whoa. explore nature. there are surprises everywhere. go to discovertheforest.org.
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♪ love stinks the emotion of love is a powerful thing. it can make you do and feel things you never knew possible. >> for one man the love he feels for his wife can literally paralyze him. here now is cynthia mcfadden. >> reporter: this is what it looks like to be in love. it's a struggle to keep your eyes open. his eyes look heavy. >> yeah, he's having a tough time. >> reporter: it's your neck giving in to gravity. is he still with us? >> i'd still be with you even if i couldn't move. >> reporter: then you disappear inside. at least this is what being in love looks like for matt frerking. >> he's okay. >> reporter: being in love with
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this woman, trish, his wife of 13 years. matt is trapped. >> so matt, if i ask you to move your finger, can you move your finger? no? >> reporter: trapped by a disease called narcolepsy with cataplexy. >> he's not dead. i'm sorry but -- >> it's scary. >> it is scary. >> reporter: sitting there, matt's not in any pain and he is fully awake. but a trigger has left him paralyzed. and matt's trigger is love. love for trish. love for his stepchildren, and their children. that basic, positive human emotion becomes a prison for him. >> i love my wife. >> matt's eyes are open. >> yep, he's opening them up. >> so things that most of us long for -- having our grandchildren and our children, having our spouses tell us they love us, all of the things that most of us live for are things that you have to avoid? >> yes. i have to limit those things very carefully. >> reporter: the everyday emotional moments that most of
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us cherish are land mines to matt. the walls of their oregon home are nearly bare. only a few family pictures remain. but mostly out of sight. it can be a hellish existence. we witness how even the simplest things become threatening for matt. like the new dog trish got so she'd have somewhere to express her love. >> i want someone to play with, yeah. >> reporter: there are two things matt has no problem doing. one, surprisingly, is driving. it helps him focus and stay awake. >> as long as i carefully avoid emotional topics, the risk of having an unprovoked, unexpected attack is nil. >> reporter: and the second thing is work. the deep irony in all of this is matt is a neuroscientist. he runs his own lab at the oregon health sciences university. matt is usually fine at work. but taking the necessary
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precautions. no pictures on the wall. and the staff knows what to expect. >> he let me know that if i ever were to make a joke and he immediately left the room after that, that i should not be offended. because he has to do that for his self-protection. >> you must have wondered, trish, was it the best thing for him to stay with him or to relieve him from -- >> absolutely. we had that discussion. i think that was probably one of the most difficult things that has occurred, is we recognized that, in fact, the trigger was typically me. we've talked about it and fought through it and i think we both agree that's not the best thing. and he does still want me in his life, and i still want him in mine. i think, honestly, that we're very lucky to have one another. >> so what did you learn about love in the last four years? >> love endures a lot. i like my life.
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no disease gets in the way of that. >> i think it helps a lot to be with the right person. the fact that it's hard for him, it's hard for me. i want to finish life with this guy. and i feel really thankful that he wants to continue on through life with me. >> despite not being able to move when he's feeling love for you? i mean, i think we're -- do you think we're there, matt? >> reporter: once more, matt becomes paralyzed by love. a love he refuses to give up. >> fascinating story to even talk about breaking up in order to kind of release him from the love of her that caused that paralysis. that's incredible. >> it's also interesting, because that particular disease, that narcolepsy with cataplexy, affects 50,000 americans. different triggers. you can see more of cynthia mcfadden's special, 10:00 p.m. eastern.
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finally this half hour, the fight to save the birth place of beatles legend ringo starr. fans say starr's home should be recognized and refurbished. >> but the city of liverpool disagrees and the bulldozers are ready. the bbc's ed thomas has more. >> reporter: in mini buses, in taxis and in coaches. >> that was the house in which ringo starr was born. >> reporter: fans from germany, italy and canada all here to see the birth place of a beatle. soon to be demolished. >> i can't believe that they would knock it down. in germany, you would preserve this, rescue this. >> reporter: on the 7th of july, 1940, ringo began his journey here.
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with john, paul and george, the beatles took on the world. what does ringo remember of his heritage now? >> as a kid they were all avenues. it's really strange, you know. it's really a narrow little road which has all changed now. >> reporter: what hasn't changed is john lennon's and sir paul mccartney's former liverpool homes. they're both protected by the national trust. but liverpool city council say the birth place of ringo starr isn't the same. nobody really knows how long he lived here for. some say three months, others three years. and what's needed here now, they say, is regeneration. >> it's falling to pieces. it's subsiding. we can't keep buildings alive and protect them simply because somebody had a limited association with it. >> reporter: beatles experts compare this house to shakespeare's. >> the council in liverpool are wrong. in 400 years' time people will
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still be coming to liverpool because of the connection with the beatles. >> reporter: some who live and work here believe new homes should come before ringo. >> it's for the people in the area. not just to save it. it's nothing to liverpool. >> reporter: so for next march there will be one less stop on the beatles tour. ed thomas, bbc news, liverpool. >> interesting debate. my thing, if they preserve paul mccartney's house and john lennon's house, for the sake of uniformity you'd think they'd give a nod to the other beatle. apparently not. >> maybe they should just let it be. >> oh! she's here all week, folks. that was good. >> that is the news for this half hour. you can always tell us what you think of our show by logging on to our facebook fan page. >> just logon to wnnfans.com. coming up next, more news on abc.
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military milestone. u.s. combat troops leave iraq. the relieved soldiers and the pentagon's strategy. then, battlegrounds near new york's ground zero. why the debate over a planned islamic center is now intensifying. and, pet project. >> maybe she could get a mouse. >> the lessons from dogs. it's thursday, august 19th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> and good morning, i'm rob nelson. >> i'm vinita nair. thousands of u.s. soldiers have crossed the border from iraq to kuwait this morning. it is the last american combat brigade to leave iraq. >> the war is winding down ahead of president obama's deadline. t.j. winick has the latest to now. good morning, t.j.
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>> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. to be clear, the u.s. combat operation is not over until the end of this month. when brigades that are left will be remissioned to advise and assist brigades. it's the last combat brigade to leave iraq. the 4,000 men and women of the 4th stryker brigade 2nd infantry division. after almost seven and a half years of war, these are pictures america has desperately been waiting for. troops rolling across the barbed wire crossing wednesday out of iraq and into kuwait. there is much to be thankful for. >> immense, immense relief. it's over, it's all over for us. >> reporter: the stryker brigade, named for the vehicle that delivers soldiers into and out of battle, has lost 34 of its troops. it was at the forefront of some of the worst, fiercest fighting, including eastern baghdad, hotbed of the insurgency during the surge of 2007. >> kind of mixed feelings about it. because we're going home. you know. and -- i mean, in spite of what
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everybody says, we are kind of making history here. >> reporter: president obama had set august 31st as the deadline for ending american combat operations in iraq. so the last combat brigade has left, the official combat mission will not end for another couple of weeks. >> our commitment in iraq is changing from a military effort led by our troops to a civilian effort led by our diplomats. >> reporter: 50,000 u.s. troops will remain in-country in noncombat roles until the end of next year. rob and vinita? there has been a major expansion in that egg recall linked to salmonella. an iowa company is now recalling 380 million eggs because of the public health threat. that is nearly 32 million cartons. the company, wright county eggs, produced the eggs at its plant in iowa. hundreds of people have gotten sick in at least three states. >> because we eat a lot of eggs. want to make sure that we're not -- don't get sick from it. >> this outbreak could really be one of the largest linked to eggs that we've seen in 20 years. >> normally eggs become
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contaminated through rodent droppings or other unsanitary conditions. but public health inspectors say in this strain the hens' ovaries became infected, passing the bacteria on inside the egg. a mountain of legal work must be done in north carolina. now that 15 years of potentially tainted evidence has been uncovered there. that evidence was used in court against suspects even though their defense attorneys had no access to it. richard cantu has more. >> reporter: it is the ultimate injustice. imprisoned, even facing execution, and all of the time completely innocent. that's what happened to greg taylor, who spent 17 years behind bars for a murder he did not commit. in february, he was set free. after allegations broke that some north carolina crime lab technicians buried blood test results taken from the crime scene. in a blistering report released wednesday the fbi found that agents of the state bureau of investigation helped prosecutors obtain convictions for over 16 years. >> i firmly believe in the interests of justice that the
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full case files in each of these cases should be reviewed by both prosecutors and appropriate defense counsel. >> reporter: of the 190 cases that will now be reviewed, four people are sitting on death row. three have already been executed. and five died in prison. one of those cases involved two men who were convicted in the roadside murder of michael jordan's father. >> this was a bad practice. and there was confusing and bad policy. >> reporter: four of the eight analysts named in the report still work at the fbi. the state says they'll be disciplined. for greg taylor, that's little retribution for time lost. >> what is it worth to miss your daughter's 10th birthday, to miss her high school graduation, miss her college graduation, to hear about her walking down the aisle at her wedding by herself. you know -- you couldn't give me anything for missing that. >> richard cantu, abc news. former illinois governor rod blagojevich is losing some of
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his keepsakes because of unpaid storage warehouse bills. items from seven storage containers are going up for bid including a statue of elvis. friends of the former governor rented the storage space in suburban chicago but the warehouse owner says nobody's paid the bill for five years. the proceeds will go to charity after the auction. thousands turned out to say a final farewell to former alaska senator ted stevens. more than 20 current and former senators, governors and foreign representatives also attended last night's funeral, which was held in anchorage. among the speakers was vice president joe biden. he talked about the deep bond he shared with stevens. both men lost their first wives in tragic accidents. president obama wrapped up his cross-country trip that concentrated on his economic message. the president is back at the white house now ahead of a family vacation on martha's vineyard. even though he was focused on the economy in ohio yesterday the political hot button issue of the moment was never far away. david kerley traveled with the
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president. >> reporter: if he has any regrets jumping into the ground zero islamic center debate, a definitive response. >> the answer is, no regrets. >> reporter: the setting was the backyard of the whiteman family of columbus, ohio, where the president admitted the economy isn't growing fast enough. >> a lot of it's sort of like recovering from an illness. you get a little bit stronger each day and you take a few more steps each day. >> reporter: that's far from the promised recovery summit, with administration predictions of up to 500,000 jobs created every month. >> we're going to continue to create jobs on a monthly basis. it will be up and down but the path is going to continue to be strong. >> reporter: instead, the economy has lost jobs this summer. and a new poll says only 41% of americans approve of the president's handling of the economy. so mr. obama is now pleading for patience, conceding it will take years for the economy to recover. >> we're not going to get all. 8 million jobs that were lost back overnight.
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it's going to take some time. >> reporter: that is a recognition there is little the president can do to move the economic numbers before the election. >> basically, it's the only message that democrats have. things were bad, but we're on the right track, trust me, it's going to get better. >> reporter: crisscrossing the country, trying to convince voters for more time, the president is making a claim the republicans have no answer for the nation's problems. >> you remember our slogan during the campaign, yes, we can? their slogan is, no, we can't. no, we can't. it's really inspiring. >> reporter: a message the president hopes will limit democratic losses this fall. david kerley, abc news, columbus, ohio. and in sports news this morning, brett favre says this is his last season, seriously. favre is back with the vikings for what will be his 20th nfl campaign. he's finishing up a two-year, $25 million contract. favre's first action could be sunday night's preseason game against the 49ers. back and forth with brett.
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>> i've been here two years and i've read that same story like four times. >> maybe next year. here's a look at your weather. steady downpours and flooding from new orleans to atlanta. rain in tennessee, virginia and the carolinas. scattered showers in new england and upstate new york. severe wither from fargo to milwaukee and thunderstorms in the southwest. >> phoenix climbs to 107. sacramento 89. 90s in omaha, kansas city and indianapolis. 103 in dallas. and 92 in new orleans. 80s in boston, new york, and atlanta. more than 100 families in south carolina are making waves for a good cause. >> they hit the beach along with a special camp for autistic children. the group called surfers healing pairs professionals with kids so they can appreciate the sport. the group's founder says the children living with autism respond to the water in a magical kind of way. >> that's a great idea. parents say it's incredible to see how the kids calm down. some of them as you can imagine cry as first but 99% of them
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eventually get it and you can see by the smiles there they enjoy it. >> we'll be right back with more after this. diabetics on medicare! i'm a diabetic and i want you to know over 230,000 u.s. their diabetic supplies through liberty medical. and that begins with the one touch ultra 2 meter. easy to use, fast results... at no additional cost! liberty helps keep you on track by delivering diabetic supplies to your door...and filing your claims. i never feel i'm going to run out of anything. with liberty i always have someone to talk to and now they refill all my prescriptions. call now to receive a diabetic cookbook free. call to receive the one touch®ulra meter at no additional cost and find out why 230,000 u.s. doctors and over a million people with diabetes trust
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and she said hair was growing back... i was like, yes, this works... [ male announcer ] only rogaine is proven to regrow hair in 85% of guys. puhh puhh puhh putt and that's it. [ male announcer ] stop losing. start gaining. the proposed islamic center to be built blocks away from ground zero has stoked the fires of debate in this country. >> a recent poll shows a majority of new yorkers oppose that center being constructed. john berman gets to the root of this ongoing debate. >> reporter: it has been labeled by some as the ground zero mosque. even though it's not quite a mosque, and even though it's not quite at ground zero. but the cordoba house is dominating national discussion. >> this is a slap to those innocent victims who were murdered. >> 1.5 billion muslims in this world aren't in al qaeda.
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>> reporter: in a walk around ground zero, we heard both sides of the debate. >> i believe they would offer a side of islam that is peace-loving, the kind of neighbor we would want to have here in this country. >> this is radical islam building a triumphant 15-story building on the cemetery of our loved ones. >> reporter: unlike many people debating this issue from afar, both father kev mattigan and retired firefighter tim brown have deep emotional ties to september 11th. father mattigan's church was just a block away from the towers. >> i was in the church when the first plane struck the tower. then i rushed out, seeing if i could be of any help to anybody. >> reporter: brown, who was detailed to the mayor that day, lost 93 of his friends. >> we got within 20 feet of the door of tower two to go back into the lobby when it collapsed. you could actually hear the floors pancaking. hitting each other.
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>> reporter: brown is close to many victims' families and has been a vocal critic of the center. >> they will be praying at the grave of their loved ones and they will hear allah akbar coming through the block. >> the call to prayer. >> reporter: at the pentagon, also attacked on september 11th, there is a prayer room where muslims worship every week. the military says they've received no complaints. brown insists he has no issues with islam on the whole. where should they pray in new york city? >> there are hundreds of mosques in new york city. there are many, many mosques. right around here. plenty of places -- >> can you hear the call to prayer from those mosques? >> i don't know, i haven't gone in. >> reporter: there are strip clubs, a betting parlor, and a planned shopping mall that will be underground at ground zero itself. >> imam rauf himself says he wants to leverage 9/11. we call it a mega mosque. it's meant to make a statement. and it's a statement that we don't want to be made here. >> reporter: brown is talking
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about the man behind the planned 13-story, $100 million cordoba house. imam faisal abdul rauf. brown criticizes rauf for failing to disclose the source of his funding and also questions his background, saying he refuses to denounce the palestinian group hamas. but rauf has worked with both the bush and obama administrations on outreach to muslims overseas. the planned islamic center is about two and a half blocks from the world trade center site, a bit of a walk. >> it took us two minutes and 45 seconds to walk here, where the islamic center's going. you know what, one of the things some people say is that this is isn't at ground zero. >> yeah, but -- what is ground zero? and this building was damaged by the landing gear of the plane. >> reporter: just too close, he says. >> i just don't know if this is the place to do it. this is sacred ground here. this is -- it's too hurtful. >> i think it could be part of
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the whole path to rebuilding, reconciliation, establishing peace, looking toward the future through looking to the past. >> you acknowledge families are hurt by it? >> i'm certain the families are hurt by it. the families are to be respected. they have their feelings and sent its and i respect that. but i disagree -- i don't think those feelings have a veto power or trump the basic right to worship. >> reporter: nothing was settled near ground zero today but for all the yelling on tv, one thing was accomplished. there was a friendly discussion about a divisive issue. i'm john berman in new york. >> with all the debating we've been listening for months now about this mosque, one thing i did find interesting is that within american muslims themselves, within that group, there are people within that subset that are even saying, we're skeptical, we are fearful it could also be perceived as insensitive. often you hear people of other ethnicities and races saying that.
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i think there's a sensitivity within the american muslim mindset as well. they don't want to offend more people as well. >> governor paterson chiming in saying he thinks it would be a noble gesture for them to take the site somewhere else. opinions all across is spectrum here. coming up next, much lighter news. from one radio host to another, howard stern's comments about dr. laura. >> we had to bleep a lot of it out. >> yeah, no doubt. >> and celebrities targeted in an alleged scam find out who's accu go
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judging by our own facebook fan page you guys have a lot to say about dr. laura and her use of the "n" word 11 times in five minutes. and you are not alone. because howard stern sort of took aim at her yesterday on his satellite radio program.
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he played the audio of her public resignation on "larry king" and then went after her. take a listen. >> all these years she's free but now she said the "n" word she wants to retain her first amendment rights. just because you have first amendment rights doesn't mean all your speech is appropriate. what is she talking about? she wants to maintain her first amendment rights? she hasn't lost any rights. some people didn't like what she had to say. >> if you listen to the entire thing on the radio he kind of went on to say he's not a fan of hers and hasn't been a fan of hers even before all of this came out. dr. laura is in the headlines a lot right now. if you've missed sort of the hubbub, more or less an african-american woman called in with a white husband and said his friends are insensitive, they're using the n world. and dr. laura in trying to defend her philosophical point went on to use the "n" word 11 times in five minutes. a lot of controversy. >> i assume there's more to that tape. >> we bleeped a lot of it out.
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he's always more colorful than that. >> yes, indeed. count on howard for that. interesting story out of hollywood. apparently in court today there will be this -- her name is gabriela studio. she owns a fancy salon out in beverly hills. apparently she has a high list clientele roster there. she's being accused of credit card fraud and taking $300,000 from some very a-list clients of hers including jennifer aniston, melanie griffith, liv tyler, anne hathaway. cher is listed in the indictment as well but came out and said, i'm not a client of hers. i don't know what went wrong here. $280,000 in a year's time alone from these clients. so this issue is going to court today, federal court. should be interesting how that turns out. if you have that kind of roster, that kind of money, i can see where someone's skimming off the top. $300,000 in a year, like that. so now she may be busted. >> it's not just normal people who fall prey to these kind of
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scams. those are some a-listers. >> yeah. >> we have officially found the leprechaun at the end of the rainbow, and by that i mean a reality show contestant that doesn't want to be famous. apparently they have offered the bachelor, the position of the next bachelor, to this guy who was on the last "bachelorette" chris lambton and he said no. he said, i want to go back to having a regular life. if you watched the show this guy has a pretty remarkable story. he lost his mom, he came on the show to find love, really fell in love with ali, or at least i bought it, i believed it. interesting thing now is abc is saying this may not be the end. the ones who said, i don't want to be on the show, when they court them they end up being the best bachelors. >> i bet. turned down the spotlight for once. >> he's gorgeous, i would love to watch him on "the bachelor." >> you're disappointed. >> i love you, chris. i would have picked you too. >> oh, i'm sure your husband appreciates that. >> he watched it with me. >> quick "american idol" note.
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rushing real liquid relief to ease you to sleep fast. here some are stories to watch today on abc news. hearings on seafood safety begin today on capitol hill. members of congress want to know more about the long-term impact the gulf oil spill will have on the fishing industry. also, we'll learn more about new orleans' recovery today almost five years after hurricane katrina. we'll get a progress report today from the city's new mayor. the president has returned from his five-day fund-raising trip but he won't be in washington very long. he's taking his family to martha's vineyard for a vacation later today. finally this half hour, taking the bite out of reading. learning to read can be challenging for some children. >> and now a new study reveals kids can overcome those challenges with a little help from man's best friend. here now is ron claiborne. >> reporter: on a saturday afternoon at the library in norwalk, connecticut, 8-year-old kavante met brazil, a 4-year-old whippet. he chose "henry and mudge," a
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children's book about a boy and a dog, sat down on the floor, and began to read to brazil. >> white baby bunny. she had -- had soft ears -- >> reporter: he's a second grader who's insecure about his struggles with reading. but after his short time with brazil he felt he had made a friend. >> i love him a lot. >> reporter: the concept is simple. >> this one? or this? >> reporter: a dog is nonjudgmental and comforting so it takes the pressure off a child. >> if i made a mistake they won't laugh. >> if you make a mistake it can feel risky and uncomfortable. but if you're practicing with a dog you don't mind making a mistake. >> reporter: a university of california davis study confirms it. researchers found that children who read to dogs in a ten-week program were more enthusiastic, engaged, and confident. the reading skills increased by 12%. the children who did not read to dogs showed no improvement at
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all. this was kavante when he started. >> hungry -- short -- >> reporter: and six weeks later -- >> the bird said to henry's mother, henry shook his head. when you read to a dog, it makes you relax. if you don't have to worry about anybody staring at you. it's just you and the dog. >> reporter: and on his latest reading test, kavante did show improvement. >> every day, no one -- >> reporter: thanks to a friend who was willing to listen. >> okay, said henry. >> reporter: ron claiborne, abc news, norwalk, connecticut. >> well, i think that i deserve a dog for the studio. because it would probably help me to read the prompter. >> we'll get that in the next few minutes. >> it's so amazing where you see dogs now. you see them in elderly homes, you see them in hospitals. they're so therapeutic.
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